Serpentine Pavilion by Bjarke Ingels

 

Visiting the Serpentine Pavilion is now a tradition, one more to add to strawberries and Pimm’s during the great British summer.

This year’s architect is Bjarke Ingels from Denmark. He founded his practice in 2005 with offices in Copenhagen and New York. Ingels has won numerous architectural competitions and awards including AIA National Architecture Honor Award (2015); AIA NY Urban Design Merit Award (2015) and RIBA Award European National Winner (2014).

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The pavilion is the perfect setting for summer parties, but it is open to the public offering Londoners and visitors a great place to relax.

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The design is extremely clever. The wooden floor flows to allow for sitting and the bar at the other end.

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The interior feels open and relaxing. It is particularly interesting the way the structure can feel completely open, but at the same time and from a different angle, safe and enclosed.

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Standing outside the pavilion you can see through the building. But only a few steps away your perspective changes, and the structure looks solid.

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Impressive contrast of the pavilion and some stunning Catalpa

Summer Houses:

Only a few metres away, the exhibition continues and you will find four totally different summer houses by Queen Caroline’s Temple.

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Asif Khan’s design is inspired by the fact that Queen Caroline’s Temple was positioned in a way that it would allow it to catch the sunlight from The Serpentine lake.
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Yona Friedman’s Summer House takes the form of a modular structure that can be assembled and disassembled in different formations.
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Barkow Leibinger were inspired by another, now extinct, 18th Century pavilion also designed by William Kent, which rotated and offered 360 degree views of the Park.
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Kunlé Adeyemi’s Summer House is an inverse replica of Queen Caroline’s Temple – a tribute to its robust form, space and material, recomposed into a new sculptural object.
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Queen Caroline’s Temple

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If you are interested, here is last year’s pavilion by Selgascano and 2012’s by Herzog & de Meuron and Ai Weiwei.

 

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